Children, Uncategorized
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A Guide to Baby Teeth Order of Appearance

Babies are often born with their first tooth in place; this is mainly because the tooth buds have already been in development before they are born.

When will the first teeth of your baby emerge?

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Spotting the first milk tooth in your baby is always pleasant as all babies are born with their tooth buds in place while a few are even born with their first teeth. But generally, babies tend to start developing their first tooth when they hit the three-month mark or shortly thereafter.

Which tooth of the baby comes first?

As the first teeth start to emerge, your baby may start getting a bit fussy and this should generally happen after three months. However, it may take longer for a few babies even upwards to seven months or so before the primary or deciduous teeth start emerging. When it comes to the ordering of teething in babies, it is usually the lower central incisors that appear first, from six to ten months after birth. But at times, your baby may start sporting new upper central incisors first, within the same time period.

How many teeth does a baby have?

You can expect your child to start teething anytime from three to seven months, with the lower central incisors being usually the first one on the scene followed by lateral incisors. Soon, some upper-level teeth should appear as well. When it comes to the ordering of teething in babies, they should soon start sporting twenty milk teeth in no time at all.

Baby teeth chart and order of appearance

When it comes to teething, your baby will grow its first teeth on time; however, with a few babies it may take longer but no more than the usual. Here is the teething chart with the teeth order in babies and in order of appearance.

Lower central incisors

The lower central incisors are often the very first teeth to erupt and it can cause your baby to fuss, drool and even try to chew stuff.

  • When they come in – Lower central incisor should start erupting around six to ten months.
  • Function – One of the key functions of lower central incisors happen to serve one important purpose, to act as placeholders until the permanent teeth take shape when your child becomes 12.
  • Shed – Your child should start shedding his lower central incisors once he hits six years.

Upper central incisors

  • When they come in – When it comes to the baby teething order, the upper central incisors start to appear around eight to twelve months
  • Function – One of the key functions of upper central incisors is to act as placeholders for permanent teeth as well as to help the baby to chew its food
  • Shed – Babies usually start to shed around six years of age

Upper lateral incisors

  • When they come in –The upper lateral incisors start appearing around nine to thirteen months.
  • Function – You would be surprised to learn that upper lateral incisors are there to enable your baby to chew and to help him to speak as well
  • Shed –Your child should start shedding the upper lateral incisors around six years of age

Lower lateral incisors

  • When they come in –Your baby should start developing the lower lateral incisors around ten to sixteen months. You should know that your baby will develop one tooth of each sort, before developing the next one of the same kind.
  • Function – Lower lateral incisors act as placeholders for the permanent teeth which should start appearing when your child becomes twelve. Apart from this, these milk teeth help your baby to chew and speak
  • Shed – Your child should start shedding his lower lateral incisors once he reaches six years of age

Upper first molars

  • When they come in – The upper first molars come in around thirteen to nineteen months
  • Function – The upper first molars are there to help your baby to chew and even help it to speak while acting as placeholders for permanent teeth
  • Shed – Your child should start to shed his upper first molars around ten to twelve years and by the time he hits thirteen, he should have permanent teeth

Lower first molars

  • When they come in – the lower first molars should start erupting around fourteen to eighteen months after your baby is born
  • Function – The lower first molars help your baby to chew and masticate his food and at the same time serve as placeholders for permanent teeth
  • Shed – Your child should start shedding his lower first molars around ten to twelve years of age

Upper canine

  • When they come in – Your baby should start sprouting upper canine around sixteen to twenty-two months
  • Function – One of the main functions of upper canine is to serve as placeholders for upper canine
  • Shed – Your child should start shedding his upper canine once he reaches ten to twelve years of age followed by a permanent set of teeth in its place

Lower canine

  • When they come in – Your baby should start developing its lower canine around seventeen to twenty-three months
  • Function – One of the key functions of lower canine is to help your baby to chew as well as to serve as placeholders for permanent teeth
  • Shed – Your child should shed his lower canine anytime between ten to twelve years of age

Lower second molar

  • When they come in – Your infant should start developing his lower second molar once he reaches twenty-three to thirty-one months in age
  • Function – One of the key function of lower second molar is to help your baby to chew, to speak and to gnaw, apart from acting as placeholders for permanent teeth
  • Shed – your child should start shedding his molars around ten to twelve years of age with permanent teeth soon taking shape after that.

Upper second molar

  • When they come in – The upper second molars usually kick in when the baby reaches twenty-five months.
  • Function – one of the key function of upper molars is to act as placeholders; apart from that, they also help the infant to chew its food
  • Shed – your child should start shedding his upper second molar once he reaches twelve years of age

 

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